OUR VOLUNTEERS

WHY WE SERVE

In this brief video, learn more about why LEAP mission volunteers serve the organization and continue doing so year after year. The hours are long, the work is hard, and while they use their vacation days to serve, missions are anything but relaxing.

Dr. Adam Hamawy

Dr. Adam Hamawy (pictured left) is a fellowship trained plastic and reconstructive surgeon and owner of Princeton Plastic Surgeons. In addition to being an accomplished surgeon, Dr. Hamawy is an avid photographer. His ability to artistically capture the natural beauty in a landscape or that of a single flower has aided him in doing the very same for each and every one of his patients. Dr. Hamawy led a team of plastic surgeons to serve on a week-long mission to al-Hamshari Hospital in Saida, Lebanon in August. This was Dr. Hamawy’s fourth disaster relief surgical mission; he also traveled with our 2008 Belize mission team.

READ MORE

Blake Bengtson

“I’ve wanted to be a doctor for as long as I can remember, but I never knew why until after my first LEAP trip. Through that experience, I realized it is because I want to help people and to change lives, and medicine is a great avenue to do that. I have been given my gifts for a reason, and LEAP has shown me the importance of using my gifts to bless others.”

READ MORE

Laylee Ghafar

While our medical team was in Haiti in April, Christene and her mother returned for re-evaluation, and she was placed on the surgery schedule by plastic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Cone. While preparing for her surgery, Dr. Cone and plastic surgeon Dr. Steve Orten discussed Christene’s medical condition. Turner’s syndrome is a condition in which females are missing or partly missing an X chromosome with other varying associated signs and symptoms.

READ MORE

Mexico: Dr. Alejandra Garcia

By | Blog, LEAP Stories, Mission Program, News, Volunteers | No Comments

21200708_486360641718898_5888570809863226556_oDr. Alejandra Garcia, a pediatric plastic surgeon and longtime LEAP medical volunteer, helped lead a small team to Zihuatanejo, Mexico to address the need for ear reconstructions in pediatric patients. This location is outside LEAP’s usual mission locations, but we felt called to lend a hand. Below, Dr. Garcia describes the experience from her point of view.

What drew you to the need for pediatric ear reconstructions in Zihuatanejo? 
We have family in the area. They connected with a local ENT who takes care of all kinds of patients, adults, and children. He shared the tremendous need for specialists and access to care. He specifically sees a lot of children with ear malformations. He knows what an impact it has on their social development and was frustrated that he had no way to get them treatment.

When you arrived, what were some of your first impressions with regard to how the team would be able to make a difference? 
We were greeted at the airport by a full local team very enthusiastic to get this mission going. This was the first reassurance that we were meant to be here. Once we arrived at the hospital, we saw a full waiting room of patients and all the hospital staff welcoming our team. The local ENT said, “this is only the beginning, there are so many more!”

Describe the dynamics of the team that went on the trip. What were your greatest strengths? 
This was a core team, experienced LEAPers who spent weeks preparing and came with an incredible attitude to represent our organization, our mission, and step up to the challenges of a first time in a new location. Some were old friends to me, and some were new faces, yet all had that enthusiasm and dedication that I am familiar with in all LEAP volunteers.

Was there a particular patient story that moved you or a memory you will always hold dear? 
The last case we were able to do was that of a 9-year-old boy with an ear that was “curled”. While this did not require a full reconstruction, it was a challenge to get his ear to open up. His mother was tearful from the moment we said we would do the surgery, knowing this would make a huge difference in her son’s life. My favorite moment was when we took off the dressings a few days later and showed the boy his ear. He opened his eyes wide and gave the sweetest smile.

Why do you serve with LEAP? What motivates you to offer your skills to those in need? 
Everything is a gift from God. If you believe that then you know your skills are His. Every LEAP mission has been an incredibly rewarding experience for me. The camaraderie is difficult to describe. To me this means that’s what we are supposed to be doing with whatever skills we have to offer.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? 
There were so many more patients than we were able to treat, I am eager to return!

Scott Porter Captures the Heart of LEAP

By | Belize, Blog, Haiti, LEAP Stories, Mission Program, Volunteers | No Comments

scottporter profileScott Porter is a local photographer who has traveled with us this year on mission to Haiti and Belize. He’s a bit quiet and unassuming, but that’s because he’s focused on capturing the moment rather than being in it. Scott’s got an inimitable talent for capturing an entire story within a single frame. It’s always hard to explain what it’s like to be on mission, but his work represents the layers of emotion, the purity of spirit, and the sweat equity involved in the work.

We love his heart for mission, and we wanted you to get to know him a little better. He’s a pretty special human being who we’re grateful to know.

Tell a little about yourself.
Grew up in the DFW area. Went to UNT for advertising and worked as a copywriter at various ad agencies for over eight years. A few years ago, I was applying for a job as a writer at a nonprofit, and during the course of the interview, they asked what my dream job would be. The answer was to travel and take photos. And hearing myself say that out loud for the first time, I figured that if that really was my dream job, I should probably pursue it. It took a couple years of learning and growing as a photographer, but I’m finally getting to do what I love. I became a full-time freelancer in August of 2016. I still write, but I’ve been able to go on several international trips as a photographer: Guatemala twice, Haiti, and Belize.

What is it about mission work that inspires you? 
Even when I was working in advertising, I always preferred our nonprofit clients. The work I did for them felt more meaningful and more gratifying. That’s still true today. I’m not a doctor, diplomat, businessman, or educator; I have a camera and a desire and ability to go. I love what I do, and I hope the pictures I take end up making some kind of difference. Plus, it’s just really fun to be around people who are experts at what they do and are nice enough to do it to help others.IMG_2395

What was it like being part of the Haiti & Belize missions?
I really enjoyed it. I saw surgeries for the first time and was happy to find out that I’m not squeamish. I especially enjoyed meeting everyone who went on the trips and made some good friends. At the same time, I felt keenly aware that I had the least important job, but I think that was a healthy realization. I was there to play my part. And when I got tired or my feet hurt, I just realized that the same was true of everyone there, so there was really nothing to complain about – even to myself.

What have you learned about LEAP in this process? What have you learned about yourself? 
It was interesting to see the instant gratification of what LEAP does: a kid comes in with a problem, the next day he has surgery, and the problem is fixed. But that said, three days later and these surgeons have gone back to America. Some kids have to wait another year to be treated, and some kids have problems that can’t be helped through surgery at all. It can feel overwhelming because you can never help everyone. But on the other hand, you can look at a mom holding her child and know that that one surgery meant everything to them.

If you could spend time in any part of the world doing this, where would you go?
I’ve only just begun traveling, and there’s nowhere on Earth I don’t ultimately want to visit (I’ve applied for jobs in Antarctica the last two years in a row but no luck so far.). But the place I want most to work in is the Middle East. I have a heart for refugees in general but specifically Syrian refugees, and I’d love to see with my own eyes what they’re going through.

Dr. Candace Granberg Carries a Hammer for Haiti

By | Blog, Haiti, LEAP Stories, Mission Program, News, Volunteers | No Comments

17835017_906370412837859_3838507300863010161_o

Dr. Granberg started a Facebook campaign called #hammerforhaiti to raise money for LEAP with the goal of $2500 before traveling to Haiti on April 20. The plan was that if she reached that goal, she would carry the heavier hammer in the fall Hammer Race on October 7. Well, she surpassed the goal and will carry that heavy hammer!

Dr. Granberg says she’s “happy to suffer/sweat/bleed/run for such a great cause” and “will try to make the Hammer Race [her] fundraiser every year.”

 We caught up with Dr. Granberg soon after the Haiti mission to learn more about her involvement with LEAP:

Read More

LEAP Surgeons Perform Critical Surgeries on Syrian Children

By | Blog, Disaster Relief, ISAPS, LEAP Stories, News, Volunteers | No Comments

WaelAfter traveling from around the world to a hospital located in Tripoli, Lebanon, the team started conducting clinical evaluations of 90 prospective patients on January 8, 2017. The vast majority were children who sustained injuries as a direct result of the war, such as bombs or fuel exploding, or as a result of living in makeshift camps because they were displaced by war. Read More

FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN HELP.

CONTACT US TODAY